Keynote Speakers

Carol Campbell

Carol Campbell

Associate Professor of Leadership and Educational Change, OISE

Carol Campbell
Dr. Carol Campbell is Associate Professor of Leadership and Educational Change at OISE, University of Toronto. She is also Director of the Knowledge Network for Applied Education Research-Réseau d’échange des connaissances pour la recherche appliquée en education (KNAER-RECRAE), a tripartite partnership between the Ontario Ministry of Education, University of Toronto and Western University to advance the mobilization and application of research for educational practice in Ontario.

 

Carol is well-known for her commitment to connecting research to policy and practice for educational improvement. From 2005 – 2010, Carol worked for the Ontario Ministry of Education, where she was Senior Executive Officer for The Literacy and Numeracy Secretariat, was appointed Ontario’s first Chief Research Officer for Education, and became the founding Director of the Education Research & Evaluation Strategy Branch. Carol has international experience also. In the United States, she was Executive Director of the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education, Stanford University. In the United Kingdom, she worked as an advisor at school district and government levels and was an academic at the Institute of Education, University of London. Originally from Scotland, Carol completed her Ph.D. at the University of Strathclyde.

Dr. Jean Clinton

Dr. Jean Clinton

Clinical Professor McMaster University Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences

Dr. Jean Clinton
Dr Jean Clinton is a Clinical Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster, division of Child Psychiatry. She is on staff at McMaster Children’s Hospital with cross appointments in Pediatrics and Family Medicine, and an Associate in the Department of Child Psychiatry, University of Toronto and Sick Children’s Hospital.  She is also a senior scientist at the INCH (INfant Child Health) Lab at McMaster University. In addition, she is a Fellow of the Child Trauma Academy, as well as a Zero to Three Academy Fellow since 2013. She has been a consultant to children and youth mental health programs, child welfare, and primary care for almost 30 years. Dr Clinton was appointed as an education advisor to the Premier of Ontario and the Minister of Education 2014 – 2018.

Dr Clinton is renowned locally, provincially, nationally, and more recently internationally as an advocate for children’s issues. Her special interest lies in brain development, and the crucial role relationships and connectedness play therein. Jean champions the development of a national, comprehensive child well-being strategy including a system of early learning and care for all young children and their families. She is equally committed to ensuring that children’s and youths’ needs and voices are heard and respected.

Jennifer Moss

Jennifer Moss

Expert on Science-Based Workplace Happiness

Jennifer Moss
Jennifer Moss and her groundbreaking work on the power of happiness are transforming hundreds of schools and companies. Jennifer is the Cofounder of Plasticity Labs, a tech company that provides organizations with the tools to tap into employee sentiment and increase workplace happiness.

Kim Katrin Milan

Kim Katrin Milan

Co-Founder of The People Project & Activist for Justice and Inclusion

Kim Katrin Milan
Kim’s ‘The People Project’ is an initiative to bring forth local and international community development through alternative education, art­-activism and collaboration. Her presentations are anchored in a modern version of The Golden Rule. Rather than assuming the way you want to be treated is the standard for all, Kim encourages audiences to treat people the way they want to be treated, which means we have to ask and listen.

Neil Pasricha

Neil Pasricha

Happiness Expert | Bestselling Author of The Book of Awesome

Neil Pasricha
A Harvard MBA, New York Times bestselling author, award-winning blogger, and one of the most popular TED speakers in the world, Neil Pasricha is “a pied piper of happiness” who dazzles audiences with ideas that skyrocket happiness into the stratosphere. With infectious enthusiasm, heartfelt authenticity, and a “what works” authority, Pasricha draws on the latest research in happiness to increase individual performance and create a more positive and productive workplace.

His first book, The Book of Awesome, is a runaway #1 international bestseller with millions of copies sold. His newest book, The Happiness Equation: Want Nothing + Do Anything = Have Everything, provides step-by-step guidelines to illustrate how to improve your time, your career, your bottom line, your relationships, and ultimately (of course), your happiness.

Pasricha’s writing and work has been featured in Harvard Business Review, Forbes, CNN, BBC, The Guardian, The New Yorker, The Sunday Times, China Daily, The Jakarta Post, The Sydney Herald and Wired.

Kevin Lamoureux

Kevin Lamoureux

Education Lead for the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, Associate Vice-President of Indigenous Affairs at the University of Winnipeg

Kevin Lamoureux
Kevin Lamoureux is currently serving as Education Lead for the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation on secondment. He is the Associate Vice-President, Indigenous Affairs at the University of Winnipeg, as faculty at the University of Winnipeg and the University of Manitoba, and is a well-known public speaker. Lamoureux has served as co-Chair for the Provincial Task Force on Educational Outcomes for Children in Care, scholar-in-residence for several school divisions, and education consultant throughout Manitoba and across Canada. His writing has been featured frequently in newspapers and many academic journals.

Lamoureux is working towards his PhD in the University of Manitoba’s Wellness and Sustainability cohort. He works closely with schools throughout Manitoba in support of Indigenous education and the inclusion of Indigenous perspectives; enrichment and talent development, and works with troubled and disengaged students.